D-Blog Week: A New Friend

Honestly, D-blog week caught me by a bit of surprise today. I’ve been so wrapped up in… well, let’s just say other stuff. When a friend reminded me and I went out to Karen’s blog, Bitter-Sweet, to take a look at this year’s topics I knew then I had no choice NOT to get on board. This event was such a moving experience last year. It turned writing about Lia and our family and diabetes into something else, something more than just me talking at a computer screen, it was me talking with friends. Which makes today’s topic so much more apropos:

It seems the most popular thing about Diabetes Blog Week is that it helps us find blogs we weren’t reading yet and connect with some new blog friends.  With that in mind, let’s kick off Diabetes Blog Week by making some new connections.  Think about the d-blogs you read that you think we may not know about and introduce us to one that you love!!  Let’s all find a new friend today!

I can’t recall exactly where or when I first met Tim Brand, writer, poet and author of the blog, Bleedingfinger. I know though that he reached out to me, which I think says a lot about a person. To be sure, Tim goes out of his way to make room in his own life to welcome others touched by diabetes, especially dads, and yields nothing whatsoever to the condition that affects two of this three young daughters. In addition to his blog, he created a popular group on Facebook called, D-Dad: A group for dads battling diabetes, and can be found there regularly posting research highlights, bits of encouragement, and friendly remarks. In fact, there is little you can count 100% of the time on when living with diabetes, but a kind word from Tim at just the right moment is one of them.

Mirror, Mirror on the Wall

Envy is often the fountainhead of unhappiness. We’ve all experienced it. A neighbor’s shiny new car. Their figure, the clothes they wear. What they get paid for the wonderful work they do. It starts on the playground as children and continues, I suppose, until dementia or death. It’s so prevalent and part of who we are it is the steam that propels even many fairy tales.

Mirror, Mirror upon the wall, Who’s the fairest of them all

Soon I’ll have that little mermaid, and the ocean will be mine

And someday, I’m gonna be a real boy!

While not all bad–think positive motivation: envy can encourage us to reach for the sky–overcoming a desire for a thing we don’t have (or in the case of malicious envy, wishing that someone else simply didn’t have it) is not easy. It is part of the human condition and ingrained in our nature to feel this way, as much as is self-preservation or procreation, or as Charles Darwin famously put it: our struggle for existence.

Coping with the green-eyed monster involves altering our perception of what happiness is. It helps if every now and then a thought or antidote comes along that makes reshaping our attitude easier to do, some reminder perhaps that acceptance of who we are is more important than our possessions or appearance or achievements. Unfortunately, such outside influences don’t come along very often. We usually have to find them for ourselves.

But not always.

This personally works for me. To fully appreciate the clip you could use some background if you haven’t seen it, but I’ll spare you. Watch the movie. It is one of the best ones ever.

Embrace. Kiss. Love.