Come What Come May

by Steve

Any parent of a child with type 1 diabetes knows the importance of living in the present. To live any other way is to focus too much on those things that lie beyond our control. Better treatments. Soaring costs. A cure. But what about that other member of the family, the sibling?

For Krista, who’s smack dab in the midst of her teen years, awareness of Lia’s diabetes isn’t enough to keep her up nights with worry, or preoccupied with how to pay for health care, or the whereabouts and funding of research. What she observes and retains is much more immediate: frequent finger pricks, food scales and carb counting, painful repetitive procedures that appear, rightly so, to get in the way of the normal, untroubled life every teenager (and everyone else for that matter) most yearn.

So what happens when Krista gets sick, or more precisely when the symptoms of her illness mock those of what Lia experienced just before her diagnosis?

Worry, that’s what.

Worry about what might be, not what is.

“Come what come may,” said Macbeth to himself after meeting the witches, those secretariats of blind ambition, oracles foretelling the future. “Time and the hour runs through the roughest day.”

I thought of this simple yet legendary line recently when Krista experienced one such medical crisis. She’d been complaining of dehydration and of frequent trips to the bathroom and fearing an infection, or worse, had been taken to see the doctor. They tested her urine for a disorder and found nothing unusual, but a trace amount of ketones. She was sent home and we were told to monitor the situation. Nothing was said about diabetes, her blood glucose level was not checked, there was no hasty rush to the ER. But that didn’t matter. Much like the throne to Macbeth by those witches, the idea had been sufficiently sown: What if?

Later that day we did check her blood and when she wasn’t feeling better the day after that we checked it again. Both times we found it normal. So it was not—or is not yet—diabetes, but the whole thing raised the question: yes, precisely, what if?

What if diabetes struck again?

There are two answers of course to that question. There is the parental answer: We know what diabetes is and we know how to treat it. We’ll deal with it. If ever there was a motto for the parent of a child with type 1 it is “Come what come may.” If it happens, it happens. We’ll manage.

Then there is the child’s answer, which is not an answer at all but more questions: How? Why? What now?

To be sure there are answers to these, just as there were answers when we learned of Lia’s diabetes two years ago. But answers take time to arrive and telling a young person the secret to a happy life is learning to endure is like telling an ambitious but dithering brave warrior of a prophecy he would be king. The reality takes some getting used to. But as Shakespeare understood, even the worst of days come to an end.

Unless, of course, you’re Macbeth.

 

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A Special Announcement

In honor of my wife and daughters and the pursuit of a healthy lifestyle by women everywhere, we are pleased to announce that beginning this week, some excerpts of the best and more memorable posts from our family’s journey of living with diabetes will appear on Lifescript.com, one of the most dedicated and respected women’s health portals on the internet.

Franca and I are honored to have this opportunity to spread awareness of Type 1 Diabetes and share with others the challenges, the small and large victories that parents, caregivers and people with diabetes demonstrate everyday to live life to fullest.

Click here to check out WOE at Lifescript